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about the partitive

 
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bluebook21



Joined: 11 Nov 2006
Posts: 4
Location: St Petersburg, Fla

PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2006 6:11 am    Post subject: about the partitive Reply with quote

hallo,

I have been studying french for a while, but it seems very difficult to understand very well the partitive, as it seems it could be used in different ways or situations or not.

Can someone help me with it, but deeply?

thanks
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hi, my name Carlos.

I would like to meet new people, so improving my langauges skills and making friends
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Jim



Joined: 06 Nov 2005
Posts: 31
Location: U.K.

PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carlos,

What on earth is the partitive?

Amitiés,

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Jim.
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bluebook21



Joined: 11 Nov 2006
Posts: 4
Location: St Petersburg, Fla

PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 3:44 pm    Post subject: what is the partitive? Reply with quote

Hallo, Jim

In french they say partitive to the difference between a and some

For example, un etudiant, une etudiante

but, des etudiantes (some students)

In the last case they do not specify, this is what the partitive is about, but I still have some doubts about it, as when it is correct to use it or not, sometimes it is not so easy to determinate.

Are you in the UK? My best wishes and merry Christmas


Cool Carlos
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Jim



Joined: 06 Nov 2005
Posts: 31
Location: U.K.

PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 5:33 pm    Post subject: Re: what is the partitive? Reply with quote

bluebook21 wrote:
Hallo, Jim

In french they say partitive to the difference between a and some

For example, un etudiant, une etudiante

but, des etudiantes (some students)

In the last case they do not specify, this is what the partitive is about, but I still have some doubts about it, as when it is correct to use it or not, sometimes it is not so easy to determinate.

I thought it might be that.

The use of the partitive article: (du, de la, la, des)

-- When the adjective preceeds the noun, it is shortened to de
de belles maisons; de beaux rêves.
- When the noun is understood but not stated, the same rule
applies: Prenez ces allumettes, j'en ai d'autres
Avez-vous des poires? - Oui, j'en ai de très grosses

-- In a few instances, where adjective and noun have come to form
a single idea, it is customary to use des rather than de:
des jeunes gens; des jeunes filles; des petits enfants.
-Applying this rule to the singular: bois de ce vin; donnez-moi
de votre buvard. But it is much more often: du bon vin; de bonne
viande, rather than the strictly correct de bon vin; de bonne viande.

-- After a negative (except ne ... que):
Je n'ai pas d'argent; Nous n'avons plus d'allumettes
-- but -- Je ne bois que d'eau.

-- Not is usually pas de: je n'ai pas de chapeau

-- Pas un usually means not a single one: je n'ai pas un sou.
There is a special circumstance in which a negative is followed by
a full partitive: Ce n'est pas de l'or, c'est du cuivre; Ce ne sont
pas des anglais, ce sont des americains.

-- La plupart takes a plural verb: La plupart des élèves sort sérieux.

-- Bien is often used to add emphasis, giving the meaning of much
or many: Après bien des efforts; avec bien de la peine.
-- but -- après beaucoup d'efforts; avec beaucoup de peine.

-- The following are connected with an adjective by de:
Quelque chose d'interessante; Quoi de nouveau; ce qu'il y a
de certain, c'est que ...; Rien de plus simple.

(From Advanced French Course - Whitmarsh & Dukes)


Hope this helps.

Are you in the UK?

Yes, I have that misfortune ...

My best wishes and merry Christmas

And to you.

--
Jim.

8) Carlos

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bluebook21



Joined: 11 Nov 2006
Posts: 4
Location: St Petersburg, Fla

PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 6:44 pm    Post subject: thanks for your response Reply with quote

Hi, JIm, how are things? Thanks for your attentive response

What I learned is that the partitive is used to indicate that a quantitiy is not known, for example

Je ai du vin because the amount of wine is not known

and for the use of the partitive de in negative sentences,

je n'ai pas de vin it is used alone before the sustantive, but

Ils ne sont pas des americains here it is not used because of the verb etre

On how much this explanation differs from yours?


good wishes, Carlos
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hi, my name Carlos.

I would like to meet new people, so improving my langauges skills and making friends
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